New Way to Protect Yourself
From Cell Phone Radiation

July 11th, 2012 by Holly Cornish

The people at Flowww International in the Netherlands say they’ve got something to protect us from cell phone radiation, which may be a cause of brain cancer. Are their devices worth a shot? Let’s take a look. . .

Continued below…

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The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) created some media buzz last year when it declared that regular exposure to mobile phone radiation was a “possible” carcinogen (see Issue #90).

The group based their statement on hundreds of scientific articles that suggest a link between cell phone radiation exposure and brain cancer.

The study raised doubts about the safety of extended cell phone use-although the results weren’t absolutely conclusive. But no matter: Even the threat of brain cancer hasn’t been enough to slow the sale and use of cell phones.

Seeing that all the nifty gadgets are here to stay, some folks with an entrepreneurial spirit got busy developing ways to protect us from the potentially damaging radiation these devices give off.

One company called Floww International has developed a wide range of radiation-protection products. They claim to have products that protect the natural human energy from being disrupted by exposure to radiation from cell phones, televisions, computer screens and other electronic devices.

Before I tell you more about how these radiation shields supposedly work—let’s take a moment to clarify the type of radiation we’re talking about…

You mean there’s more than one kind of radiation?

    According to the American Cancer Society, radiation is the emission of energy from any source.

Sunlight is one type of radiation—while the x-ray exams you get in a doctor’s office are another sort altogether. ACS says even the heat coming from your body is a form of radiation (technically true, but nothing to worry about).

Ranked from highest to lowest energy, ACS lists the main forms of radiation as follows:

  • Gamma rays
  • X-rays
  • Ultraviolet (UV) rays
  • Visible light
  • Infrared rays
  • Microwaves
  • Radiofrequency (radio) waves
  • Extremely low-frequency (ELF) radiation

The group said the most important distinction in terms of health risks from radiation is whether the energy is ionizing—that is, whether it contains enough high-frequency energy to damage cell DNA—or non-ionizing (low frequency).

The antenna on your cell phone emits radio waves and microwaves that are a form of radiofrequency (RF) energy or radiation. Although ACS claims that the energy they put out is too weak to damage cell DNA, they do acknowledge concerns that it could affect cells in other ways that could be harmful.

Here’s how companies like Floww International say they can help…

A force field of protection—or a farce?

    You might be familiar with the lead aprons and glasses that some medical professionals wear to protect themselves from frequent exposure to x-ray radiation. Or think of the lead vest a dental technician drapes you in before x-raying your teeth.

Well, Floww doesn’t offer a lead helmet to wear while you talk on your cell phone. Instead, the company says its products can “convert harmful radiation frequencies into body-friendly radiation frequencies.”

One of their gadgets can be attached to your cell phone to protect you from close and frequent exposure to radiation.

There’s another small device you can put in your pocket to create a “Floww field” around your body (I bet Superman would have snapped one up to protect himself from kryptonite!).

They even have a set of products for both home and office to help balance the energy flow and counteract harmful radiation waves.

So you might be wondering ‘how these products work?’ Well, Floww International spokesmen say they developed their products according to the principle of resonance. The WHAT?!

They say their products are built with circuits of electronic components that respond to radiation emitted by various sources. They claim these components create a “Floww field” that can block the distorted radiation waves coming from your television, tablets, cell phones and other devices.

The factsheet for their computer screen protector said it’s not uncommon for some people to experience ‘withdrawal symptoms’, such as mild headaches or nausea in the first weeks of use. They said this is probably because your body is no longer being exposed to distorted RF frequencies it has gotten used to.

While this could be true—an argument could be made that one of the electronic components in their product is causing the problems!

But Floww International isn’t the only purveyor of radiation protection products.

Another U.S. company, Research Center for Wireless Technology based in Hawaii, also provides products to help counteract harmful radiation frequencies.

They claim that balancing these RF waves can help protect your nervous system and even shield you from arthritis, depression and Alzheimer’s disease!

Now all these claims might sound a little fantastic. And it’s hard to know for sure if these products truly work. Some satisfied users confirm they do. At Cancer Defeated we’re not technical people, nor do we have the resources to conduct the lab tests that would be needed to verify the claims.

How worried should you be?

    We DO know for sure the radiation problem is for real. We just can’t gauge the scope and intensity of it. Cell phone usage, for example, may pose a small risk or a big risk. In twenty years we’ll know, too late for tens of millions of people.

And it’s not just phones. People absorb daily doses of RF waves from a wide array of electronic devices and household gadgets. Prior to, oh, 1920, no one was exposed to this stuff. It’s another experiment that modern industrial society created without planning or forethought.

Where government and industry are concerned, if something doesn’t kill you fast it’s considered safe. The idea of long-term damage hardly comes into play.

There are some things you can do to minimize your exposure to this form of radiation without buying another gadget. For example, Floww International suggests you can minimize RF waves in your bedroom by:

  • Charging your cell phone outside your bedroom.
  • Watching television in other rooms.
  • Moving your clock radio away from the head of the bed.
  • Removing plugs from sockets in the bedroom.
  • Removing electric blankets from the room.

All this may sound crazy, but there’s significant evidence that being bathed in electromagnetic radiation day and night really is NOT a good idea. I’ve seen enough evidence for the effects of magnetism on health to dissuade me from ever using electric blankets, heating pads or heated car seats. You don’t want to be closely wrapped in an electric field.

At the last conference of the Cancer Control Society, I heard a speaker discuss evidence that wireless routers — so-called “hot spots” — have introduced yet another danger. Her results were not conclusive, but they were worrying.

I have a wireless router in my home to enable my computers and mobile devices anywhere in the house. Millions of other people have them as well, as do most restaurants and coffeehouses and many other businesses.

These devices create a fairly strong radio field in a small area, and you’re in it ALL the time. The speaker at CCS recommended turning wireless routers off when they’re not in use, such as when you’re sleeping.

Do I do this? No. I’m already surrounded by a “worry field” that can’t hold one more item at this time. Like Scarlett O’Hara, I’ll worry about it tomorrow.

As for cell phones usage—you can always use the speaker function when possible and keep calls short to minimize your exposure to the RF waves from the antenna.

The most sensible idea is to use your cell phone less than a half hour a day, for things you really need, rather than chatter away on it for hours on end. But this is probably beyond most people. The need to be in touch 24/7 is yet another addiction that’s seized our society.

But if you want to reduce your risks, these are simple solutions that could help protect you from the modern “radiation bath.”

 

Kindest regards,

Lee Euler Publisher


Resources:American Cancer Society. 2010. Radiation exposure and cancer. Available online at
http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/CancerCauses/OtherCarcinogens/MedicalTreatments/radiation-exposure-and-cancer

Cardis, E. et al. Brain tumour risk in relation to mobile telephone use: results of the INTERPHONE international case-control study . International Journal of Epidemiology 2010;1-20 doi:10.1093/ije/dyq079. Retrieved at
http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/ije/press_releases/freepdf/dyq079.pdf

Floww International. 2010. Screen Flowww product information sheet. Available online at
http://www.floww.com/dnld/EN-Floww-screenFloww.pdf

National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet. Cell phones and cancer risk. Available online at
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/cellphones/print

Wargo, J. et al. Environment and Human Health, Inc. 2012. Cell Phones: Technology, Exposures, Health Effects. Available online at
http://www.floww.com/dnld/cell_phone_report_EHHI_Feb2012.pdf

International Agency for Research on Cancer. 2011, May 31. IARC classifies radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as possibly carcinogenic to humans. Retrieved from
http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/pr/2011/pdfs/pr208_E.pdf

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